Why Snoring Could Cause Health Concerns



Women Who Snore at Risk for Heart Disease

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Snoring at night does more than just keep your mate from getting a good night's rest - studies have made a connection between the occurrence of snoring and heart disease in women. What are the dangers? Why is there a connection between the two? How can you protect yourself? Let's address these concerns.

Researchers in the United States have found a significant link between heart disease and snoring. In fact, women who snore have a 200% greater risk of heart disease, making it particularly necessary to try and reduce other potential factors that could increase the risk even further.

High blood pressure and high cholesterol are two other heart-related factors that were more commonly found in women who snore on a regular basis. While those who snored on a regular basis had a 200% greater chance of suffering a heart attack or stroke, even just occasional snoring increased the odds by 50%.

This study was conducted over the course of 8 years, and included 10,000s of women, making it quite a comprehensive study. This was important because previously most studies connecting heart disease to snoring had only involved men.

Researchers believe that vibrations caused by snoring result in thickening of the carotid arteries very near to the throat. A thickening of the carotid arteries is one of the earliest signs of two other serious conditions: hardening of the arteries, and stroke.

At present this is mostly speculation, and the reasons behind the connection between the conditions are not fully understood. This does however provide substantial cause for caution when it comes to women who snore. What are some other risk factors related to heart disease that women who snore can control?

Weight is a major factor - taking off a few pounds can help anyone to lessen their risk of heart disease, but is especially important for a snorer. Quitting smoking is another good precaution. Exercise is vital to a healthy heart and is recommended for all, but again, especially for snorers. A chronic snorer who has high cholesterol or blood pressure should seek treatment to get such conditions under control.

It may also be a good idea to look into the cause of your snoring, and see if there is any way to treat it. A medical professional will be in the best position to determine if there are any procedures that can help to correct the problem, whether non-surgical in nature, or even surgical if the condition is more serious.

Last Updated:7/9/2013
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Video: Is Snoring a Stroke Risk?

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Date: 09.12.2018, 05:52 / Views: 55354